NEPAL (CONTACTS)

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CONTACTS- NEPAL

 

 1-A NEPALESE BOY

Adjoining Baba's bungalow in Dehra Dun was a garden of guava trees. Four watchmen had been hired to shoo away the birds at night. The men would shriek and shout, and Baba would complain about the noise, stating that he was much disturbed. One day Baba directed Kumar to tell the watchmen not to make so much noise at night.

Kumar did as instructed, but they laughed derisively and said, "What you say is true. But if we don't do it, the birds will eat all the fruit, and who will make up for the loss? Our boss would fire us and we would be out of work." Returning, Kumar informed Baba, who sent him back with the message that they should be less noisy while frightening away the birds. Kumar went and told them.

The next day, Baba complained that the noise that night had been worse than before. Kumar was exasperated by Baba's complaining. Baba, nevertheless, sent him to the owner of the garden, who got very upset with him for wasting his time. "If I don't tell my servants to make an uproar," the man said, "they will go to sleep and the birds would ruin my garden. But I cannot understand how you could be disturbed by their shouts. It is not possible for their noise to be heard in your bungalow."

When Baba was informed, he asked Kumar, "What is the remedy for this?"

Half-joking, Kumar said, "There is no other remedy than to buy the garden and let the birds eat all the fruit."

"A wonderful idea!" replied Baba enthusiastically. "Go and find out its price."

Kumar once again approached the owner, who became even more infuriated. "Have you any sense? Is this the time to sell a garden when it is full of fruit? Anyway, the fruit has already been sold to a contractor who is gradually taking away the produce."

When Baba was informed, he sent Kumar back with this message: "Tell the contractor not to take the produce gradually, but to collect it all at once."

Kumar returned. The owner dismissed Kumar with an angry wave of his hand, shouting at him to leave at once. When Baba was told he still complained, "Somehow this racket must be stopped. I cannot sleep and it is affecting my health, my mood and my work. Something must be done."

After a few minutes, Baba said, "All of the watchmen do not make such a loud noise. It is one boy among them who is the loudest. If you bring him here and put him to work here, the problem will be solved." Kumar left to identify the young culprit. He found him, but the boy was not convinced to give up his job. Kumar tempted him with a higher salary, but still he refused. Despite this, Kumar persisted, and at last the boy was prevailed upon and brought to Baba, who was pleased to see him.

The eighteen-year-old lad was Nepalese and did not know Hindi very well. Baba asked him his salary, and with a very funny accent he replied, "Powcheese rupiya" (instead of pacheece rupiya meaning, Rs.25). Baba enjoyed his way of speaking Hindi and assured him, "You will get Rs.50 working here, plus food and clothing. Besides this you will be educated."

The boy was overcome with joy and Bhau was given the duty of teaching him. He was provided with cotton and woollen clothing, and all his comforts were seen to. But he now began behaving like a boss — with Bhau as his servant! Bhau's duty included making his bed, bringing his food, cleaning his dishes and generally seeing that he was happy.

Although the nightly ruckus in the garden continued, Baba now expressed no signs that he was disturbed.

He loved the Nepalese boy, and his stay pleased Baba. From the day the boy moved in, Baba disregarded the noise. The boy stayed in Bhau's room and tried to learn what he was taught, but his head would ache with the least effort. A he would pronounce as aa, and he learned virtually nothing, even after two months. Baba would call him daily and repeatedly ask, "What wages were you getting there?" and in his peculiar pronunciation he would utter, "Powcheese rupiya," which would delight Baba and make him laugh.

The background of the Nepalese boy was that he was an only child and had, for some reason, run away from home. His parents were distraught at his disappearance and wept sorrowfully for him. They had tried to find him, but were unsuccessful. This was learned when a friend of the boy's from Nepal came to visit him in Dehra Dun two months later. When Baba was told, he persuaded the boy to return home. Baba would daily lay his head on the lad's feet and embrace him, and only his love made the boy obey.

The youth was given Rs.300 and left willingly. Had he not come to Baba, he would never have gone home. Thus, after a couple of months, the true reason for Baba's "disturbance" came to light. (Lord Meher-p-3402/3/4-1953)

 

2-KRIPAL

For nine months Meher Baba had set up headquarters in Dehra Dun. Baba left Dehra Dun with the men and women mandali at noon on Sunday, 29th November 1953. The two Nepalese boys, Kirpal and Khushal, who used to cook for the mandali in Dehradun, (Lord Meher-3421-1953)

 

3-KUSHAL

For nine months Meher Baba had set up headquarters in Dehra Dun. Baba left Dehra Dun with the men and women mandali at noon on Sunday, 29th November 1953. The two Nepalese boys, Kirpal and Khushal, who used to cook for the mandali in Dehradun, (Lord Meher-3421-1953)