PAKISTAN (CONTACTS)

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CONTACTS – PAKISTAN

 

1-A DRIVER

On 27th July 1943, Baba and the men returned to Lahore. A Victoria (horse-drawn carriage) was hired in Lahore to take Baba and some of the women to the movies.

The driver did not know who Baba was, but seeing that he was silent, the driver would talk with them through hand signs. Baba, in turn, would reply with hand gestures. Although they told the man to speak, he would not. Baba understood his signs and he understood Baba's. While gesturing, the driver's whole body would shake and wiggle, and Baba greatly enjoyed "talking" with him. (Lord Meher-p-2371-1943)

 

3-ADEL KHARAS

(Brother of Minoo Kharas)

Baba embraced and caressed him lovingly, releasing his Breeze of Joy in his heart. There was a ban on touching Baba's feet, but Minoo Kharas' brother Adel was unaware of it and bowed down to Baba. Baba did the same to him. (Lord Meher-p-2939-1950)

 

5-ARJANI A.K.

In 1958, Dr. Deshmukh wanted to have group photographs taken with Baba, but Eruch explained that there was no time. On Deshmukh's insistence, Baba asked who would take this responsibility. He added that if the person who took the responsibility failed to fulfill it, he would have to fast for seven days on water — not for any spiritual benefit, but as a punishment! Adi Arjani of Karachi was prepared to shoulder the responsibility and to arrange for the photographs to be taken on the 19th between 9 and 10:00 A.M. Baba decided the photographs should be taken at lower Meherabad rather than on the hill.

Even though Baba did not like the idea of photographs at this time, he agreed to the plan to please those who wanted it, but he remarked, "What is the use of having my photograph on paper; it would be best to establish it in one's heart."

Ramjoo opposed the taking of photographs, and a discussion (sometimes heated!) ensued between those in favor of it and those against it. (Lord Meher-p-4270-1958)

On December 31st, (1964) Baba dictated this special message to be sent to Adi Arjani in Pakistan, who did a daily-diary project of collecting Baba’s statements:

“To love those whom you could not hate is natural; but to love those whom you cannot love is to love me as I should be loved.” (Lord Meher-6298-1964)

 

7-BURJOR RAJKOTWALLA

On, 31 December 1949, Baba gave darshan in the morning in a decorated room at Khushru Quarters, Ahmednagar. Minoo Kharas with his small group from Karachi, Homi Desai of Lahore, Deshmukh from Nagpur, Nariman and Meherjee from Bombay, and other out-of-town close followers were present, as well as about 400 from Ahmednagar. Elizabeth and Norina came with Baba to take part in the program, and they enjoyed meeting everyone again.

Others among the Karachi group included Gulu and Khorshed Shroff; Minoo Kharas' fiancée Freiny and her father Kaikhushru Patel; Minoo's sister, Dina Patel; Mr. and Mrs. Mahiar Dubash; Burjor Rajkotwalla and his daughter Dolly Arjani; and Adi Dubash's mother Naize. (Lord Meher-p-2691-1949)

 

9-DESAI HOMI T

He was cousin of Keki Desai of Delhi

On 4th July 1943, Baba boarded the Punjab Mail train for Lahore with the men and women mandali. They arrived in Delhi the following night, where they halted for a few hours. Continuing on the same train, the party reached Lahore on the 6th. Chanji had already arranged two bungalows for the women, one for the men and one for guests. He made all the other arrangements for their stay with the help of Homi T. Desai (Lord Meher-p-2363-1943)

In the year 1959, Homi Desai of Lahore came for Baba's darshan. He came after several years and was eager to lay some of his problems before Baba. But on seeing him, Baba stated, "Homi, just sit here quietly for five minutes and then leave." Homi sat down, but his mind was in turmoil. After five minutes Baba asked him to go, and he left highly disappointed. He thought that he had lost his chance, but Baba sent someone with a message to tell him to come the next day. The whole night he kept awake, worries filling his mind. He appeared the next morning, but Baba again told him to keep quiet and leave after five minutes. Homi flushed with anger, but Baba asked him to come again the following day.

The third day, deeply troubled, Homi arrived at Guruprasad. His eyes were red from lack of sleep and his mind was churning. "Sit here for five minutes and don't say anything," Baba stated. "Then go."

At first Baba took no notice of him, but the next moment when Baba gazed at him, his clouded mind cleared and inwardly he received the sought-after answers to his questions. Greatly heartened, Homi folded his hands and said to Baba, "Thank you," and then exclaimed, "What a butcher you are to slaughter one so slowly!"

Baba replied with a smile, "Only slow butchering leads one to the Goal. A quick end keeps you where you are." (Lord Meger-p-5424-1959)

 

 

10-DINA PATEL 

On west tour of Meher Baba in the afternoon of 18 July 1956, more than 120 people came for darshan in the large hall of the hotel. Will, Mary and Charles sat next to Baba, and Dorothy, Tom and Delia ushered in each one individually to meet Baba for one minute. To introduce newcomers, Fred Marks stood by the door with a royal blue sash across his chest like a steward. Baba distributed prasad of sweets and his photographs. Dina Patel (Minoo Kharas' sister) and her son Hoshang were also present. (Lord Meher-p-3796-1956)

 

 11-DINSHAW

(Sarosh's elder brother)

Baba was not seeing any of his followers in Karachi. But one day, curiously, Sarosh's older brother Dinshaw, who had recently moved to Karachi, came and talked casually with the Master for two hours, though he was not a devotee. (Lord Meher-p- 469-1923)

 

13-DUBASH ADI & RODHA

Rhoda Dubash along with her mother in law, Naize Dubash met Baba at Meherabad in year 1945. Rhoda Dubash's story is interesting. Naize Dubash was a devoted lover of Meher Baba, but her family — especially her husband — was antagonistic towards Baba. She used to sneak away to visit Baba whenever she had the opportunity, and she had always taught her children that Meher Baba was God.

Rhoda, on the other hand, had no faith in Baba whatsoever. In 1944, she was engaged to marry Naize's son, Adi. When Rhoda found out that he was a Baba lover, she was shocked. But she decided to go through with the wedding because she loved Adi and was sure her love could draw him away from "This Meher Baba person." Meanwhile Minoo Kharas (Adi's cousin) and Adi's mother would constantly talk to her about Baba and, since Rhoda was the prospective daughter-in-law, etiquette demanded that she listen — though she was not interested or impressed.

Rhoda had been a very religious child and somewhat romantic. She had always had a secret wish that when she got married God should bless her wedding in the form of a slight drizzle — a few sprinkles of rain — as a sign of his blessing. Just one day before her wedding in Karachi, on 1 July 1945, she had been hearing so much about Meher Baba's greatness during the last months that she issued a challenge to him: "If you are what they say you are, you will send me heaven's blessings on my wedding day." She promptly forgot all about the ultimatum in the hectic hours preceding the large and lavish ceremony.

Karachi is such a dry city that it hardly ever rains. But on that July day, suddenly the sky grew dark and without warning it rained very heavily, more than an inch. Within half an hour, there was knee-deep water in some parts of Karachi. Eight-hundred guests had been invited to the wedding, but only 100 to 150 came. The rain lasted until the end of the ceremonies.

When Rhoda first met Baba at Meherabad, he called her and her husband to him and asked if they had any questions. Rhoda did not say anything, but the thought that kept creeping into her mind was: "You sent me heaven's blessings on my wedding day!" She became his forever. The bride who had wanted to draw her husband away from Baba, was herself brought to his feet.

Naize Dubash and her daughter-in-law, Rhoda, were permitted to see Baba at Meherabad on the 27th and 28th. Rhoda Dubash's story is interesting. Naize Dubash was a devoted lover of Meher Baba, but her family — especially her husband — was antagonistic towards Baba. She used to sneak away to visit Baba whenever she had the opportunity, and she had always taught her children that Meher Baba was God. Rhoda, on the other hand, had no faith in Baba whatsoever. In 1944, she was engaged to marry Naize's son, Adi. When Rhoda found out that he was a Baba lover, she was shocked. But she decided to go through with the wedding because she loved Adi and was sure her love could draw him away from "this Meher Baba person." Meanwhile Minoo Kharas (Adi's cousin) and Adi's mother would constantly talk to her about Baba and, since Rhoda was the prospective daughter-in-law, etiquette demanded that she listen — though she was not interested or impressed.

Rhoda had been a very religious child and somewhat romantic. She had always had a secret wish that when she got married God should bless her wedding in the form of a slight drizzle — a few sprinkles of rain — as a sign of his blessing. Just one day before her wedding in Karachi, on 1 July 1945, she had been hearing so much about Meher Baba's greatness during the last months that she issued a challenge to him: "If you are what they say you are, you will send me heaven's blessings on my wedding day." She promptly forgot all about the ultimatum in the hectic hours preceding the large and lavish ceremony. (Lord Meher-p-2517-1945)

Karachi is such a dry city that it hardly ever rains. But on that July day, suddenly the sky grew dark and without warning it rained very heavily, more than an inch. Within half an hour, there was knee-deep water in some parts of Karachi. Eight-hundred guests had been invited to the wedding, but only 100 to 150 came. The rain lasted until the end of the ceremonies.

When Rhoda first met Baba at Meherabad, he called her and her husband to him and asked if they had any questions. Rhoda did not say anything, but the thought that kept creeping into her mind was: "You sent me heaven's blessings on my wedding day!" She became his forever. The bride who had wanted to draw her husband away from Baba, was herself brought to his feet.2518/1945

In 1949.Adi Dubash had come from Karachi with his wife Rhoda and their one-and a half-year-old son, whom Baba had named Merwan. The child had just begun talking, and as he was walking around the room, he loudly shouted, "BABA!" All were surprised, and Baba commented, "There! Of the many on the 'waiting list,' I have selected him!"

In 1954, once Baba asked Adi, "How is Rhoda as a wife?"

"A-1 (Number one)!" Adi replied emphatically.

Baba asked Rhoda about Adi as a husband. "A-1," she, too, said.

Thereafter, Baba informed the principal, "Now, there is no need for any message. Let Adi and Rhoda mount the stage during the school assembly as an example of an ideal couple."

Baba sent Rhoda away and kept Adi in Rosewood for the function that evening, at which time he would be "giving up" the alphabet board, as he had previously declared.

Before she left, Baba asked Rhoda something curious. "If I ask you to give me one of your sons would you give him to me willingly?" Baba said.

"Of course, Baba," Rhoda replied. "They are yours." Nevertheless, as she sat in a corner while Baba spoke with the mandali, tears welled up in her eyes. Even from a distance, Baba noticed this and commented, "Why are you crying now? A time will come when you will weep without stopping."

In August of 1954 Meher Baba was in Satara, and I was visiting Panchgani, a hill station a few miles away, with my two sons. On 30th August, Rusi Billimoria, the cousin whom I was visiting, and another friend from Panchgani were going by car to Satara for some work. I decided I couldn't pass up this opportunity, so I asked my cousin to let me accompany them to Satara and drop me at Grafton Villa, where Baba was staying.

As we approached Satara, I was suddenly filled with misgivings. What would Baba say about me dropping in unannounced? What was I thinking of? But then I assured myself that I needed to see Baba and tell Him what I had wanted to tell Him at the airport in Karachi two years earlier. In any case, it was too late to turn back. As we approached Grafton Villa, I asked Rusi to stop the car a short distance from the gate of the villa.

I got out of the car and told Rusi to come back for me in the evening. By that time I knew something of Baba's ways, and I thought if the car waited for me, He would see me for only a few minutes and then send me packing. But without a car, I would be helpless, and Baba would have to take me in. "Everything is fair in love and war," I concluded, and when the car was only a tiny speck in the distance, I walked to the gate.

Rano Gayley, one of the mandali, appeared and asked me what I wanted.

"I've come to see Meher Baba," I said.

"He doesn't see anyone," answered Rano.

"That's all right. Just give Him a message. Tell Him that a lover of His has come from Karachi to dedicate her life at His feet."

Rano's hand shot out over the gate, and we shook hands. "Wait a minute," said Rano. She went into the house. A few minutes later she returned and said, "I've given your message to Baba. He is very happy and He wants you to come to Rosewood Cottage at 2:00 this afternoon."

I was overjoyed. "Could you tell me where Rosewood Cottage is?"

"Why? Don't you have anyone to take you there?" asked Rano.

I was all innocence. "No, I'm sorry, but I'm absolutely alone here."

"Wait a minute." Rano went inside again.

I waited, certain that Baba would call me in. But a few minutes later Dr. Goher appeared with her bicycle and said, "Baba has asked me to take you to Kohiyar Satarawala's house and to give him Baba's instructions to bring you to Rosewood Cottage at 2:00."

"Well," I thought, "you can't say I didn't try." But what could I really have expected? Baba is the Avatar and He is always one up on us.

Kohiyar, another follower of Baba's, was overjoyed to see me, as this would give him a chance to have Baba's darshan too. Soon we sat down to eat lunch, but I couldn't wait for it to be over, as I was so eager to get started. "Come on, let's go," I said repeatedly. So Kohiyar and I set out on foot, tracking through the fields until we reached the main road. Suddenly we saw a car approaching at full speed, honking. Kohiyar stopped abruptly. "It's Baba!" he said. "That's His car."

The car drew up to where we were standing, and Eruch leaned out the window on the driver's side. He smiled at me. "Couldn't you wait until 2:00?" he laughed. "Well, in any case, Baba has sent His car. He told me it was too hot for you to be out walking, and He said to take the car and bring you."

"Where does Baba sit in the car?" I asked.

"The front seat," Eruch replied.

I jumped into the front seat and rode in silence toward Rosewood Cottage, deeply touched by Baba's thoughtfulness and His concern for my welfare.

As we drew up at Rosewood, Eruch said, "Go in. Baba is waiting for you."

We entered the main room, and for a moment I couldn't see Baba, as my eyes hadn't adjusted from the bright light outside. And then I saw Him, sitting in an armchair on one side of the room. Love radiated from His whole being. As I approached Him hesitantly, He opened His arms, and the next moment I felt His embrace. There are some moments in life when one cannot find adequate words. For me this was one of those moments. Suffice it to say that time stood still for me in the embrace of my Beloved. Love, beauty and peace flooded me. I had come home.

Baba gestured for me to be seated at His feet. He said, "Your love makes Me very happy."

In 1955, when Baba and the mandali were returning from America and Europe in 1952, Rhoda and Adi met Baba at the airport in Karachi, with their two sons. Rhoda wanted to put Homi in Baba's arms, but Baba stopped her, and instead took their eight-year-old son Merwan on his lap. Similarly, when Adi and Rhoda had met Baba in Satara after the September 1954 meeting, Baba asked her about Merwan but not about Homi. Baba had said, "If I ask you to give me one of your sons, would you give him to me willingly?" Rhoda had replied that she would.

It was on the afternoon of 16 April 1955 when little Homi fell down from the first story window of their home, and was rushed to the hospital, where he died within half an hour, without regaining consciousness. Baba then asked Eruch to inform the gathering about the accidental death of Adi and Rhoda Dubash's five-year-old son Homi in Karachi the previous week.

Baba had issued orders to his lovers to take his name for 24 hours nonstop for one month. The Karachi group of lovers had therefore arranged the nonstop repetition of Baba's name in turns. Just after the child had plunged to his death, it was Adi Dubash's turn to participate in the repetition. Even at that critical time, he did his turn. It was Rhoda's turn next and she, too, did it. Only after someone persuaded Rhoda to allow her to take her place did they perform the last rites of their young son. They consoled themselves with the thought that Baba had wanted Homi and took him.

At the time, Baba had sent this consoling telegram: "Little Homi has come to me and is with me." A small photograph of Homi was also sent to Baba. Even though it was daytime, Baba asked for a flashlight, shined it on the photograph and later had it mailed back to the Dubash family with instructions to have it framed.

In 1958, one day Adi Dubash suddenly felt giddy and had trouble standing; he was removed to the dispensary for treatment. Baba went to his cabin and at noon, after all had eaten; he came out to depart for Meherazad. The sahavas group formed into two long rows. Baba's lift-chair was carried between them to the road, where he took his seat in the car. "A profound sense of sadness descended on Meherabad," Age related, "and tears fell from almost every eye. After giving them his company for the past several days, the pangs of separation was his gift to them. He, who resided in their hearts, created deeper aspiration to love him."

Adi and Rhoda Dubash were in Bombay at the time. Their eleven-year-old son Merwan had not been able to attend the sahavas since he was too young, so Baba saw the boy at Ashiana.

In 1960, Adi and Rodha Dubas were staying with relatives in a congested area of Poona. They would bicycle to Guruprasad and return home for lunch, and afterwards Adi and Merwan would cycle back to Guruprasad. On the afternoon of the 22nd, on the way back to Guruprasad, they were cycling through a small street when a car suddenly came from the opposite direction at high speed and narrowly missed hitting Merwan. An old man walking by saw what happened and exclaimed, "God saved him!"

On reaching Guruprasad, as they stepped into the side room where Baba was seated, Baba turned immediately to Adi and asked, "How does Merwan ride his bicycle?" Adi mentioned that the boy had just escaped a serious accident. Baba became very serious and looking annoyed said to Merwan, "Don't you think I have anything better to do than to keep my nazar on you?!"

From that day on, Baba forbade Merwan from cycling while in India. After Baba retired that afternoon, the mandali and others in the room mentioned that for the past week Baba had been asking everyone if they knew how Merwan rode his bicycle. "Does he ride carefully?" Baba wanted to know. "Is he rash? ... Does he drive fast?" Now they understood the reason for Baba's concern.

On 19 May 1963, Rhoda Dubash arrived that day with her son, Merwan. They embraced Baba, and Rhoda informed him how ill Merwan had been after she and Adi had returned home from the East-West Gathering. His Senior Cambridge exam was to start shortly after Merwan returned to Karachi from the East-West Gathering, but on his return he became sick with a very strong attack of measles. The Parsi community in Karachi criticized Adi and Rhoda for taking their son for Baba's darshan when his exams were so near. After missing the first three papers, Merwan's doctor allowed him to appear for the rest of the exams, but all expected him to fail. The result astounded everyone as he was the only Parsi to pass First Class at the top of his class, despite having not appeared for the first three exams.

One day Adi Dubash had arrived and Baba allowed Adi and his son Merwan to come to Guruprasad daily. For months, Merwan had the habit of twitching his nose. He would do it at any time and often. Adi and Rhoda tried everything to make him stop, but nothing worked.

Once, when all three were present in Guruprasad, Baba asked Dadi Kerawala, "What are you thinking?"

Dadi replied, "You know it, Baba!"

Baba commented, "I have told you many times that I will give you a wife as beautiful as the moon, and still you are thinking about it. You must have complete faith in me. When an individual has 100 percent faith in me and leaves everything to me, the burden automatically falls on my shoulders. I have my Universal work to do and I am totally engrossed in it, but the weight of that individual's burden reminds me of my responsibility toward him and I do everything for such a person."

Right after Baba stated this; the thought came into Rhoda Dubash's mind: "Okay Baba, I leave Merwan's nose-twitching 100 percent to you."

Immediately after thinking this, Baba turned to her and gestured, "Why is Merwan twitching his nose?

Rhoda pleaded, "Oh Baba, we have tried everything and he won't stop!"

Baba turned to the boy and sternly corrected him, "Merwan, why do you do this?" Baba did a perfect imitation. "It is not a good habit. Someday someone will beat you up for it."

Baba then narrated this incident:

A friend of my father's was in the habit of winking. Once while he was accompanying Sheriarji somewhere, they passed a few fishermen with their womenfolk. Unintentionally, the friend winked suddenly and the fishermen got very upset [believing he was winking at their wives]. Catching hold of him one began shouting abuses at him, and was about to beat him when Sheriarji intervened, saying, "He did not do it on purpose; it is his habit." At that very moment, the friend winked at the fisherman, and he and the others saw that it was an unconscious habit and let him go.

Baba jokingly told Merwan, "In this way you too may one day be beaten!" Then he became very serious and instructed Merwan, "From now on you must stop twitching your nose, and if I catch you doing it again, I don't want to see your face again!"

A few minutes later, Baba caught Merwan twitching his nose but forgave him as he was doing it unconsciously. This happened a few times and each time Baba forgave Merwan and said, "I will let it go for today as you are doing it unconsciously, without realizing it. But remember, from tomorrow, if I catch you twitching your nose I do not want to see your face again!"

He told Adi and Rhoda, "If he ever does this again after you return home, send me a telegram."

Rhoda said, "I will pay for the telegram from Merwan's pocket money."

Baba replied, "No, you pay half of it."

From that time on, Merwan stopped twitching his nose. Not once did he do it again. During the ensuing years, when Baba was in strict seclusion and no correspondence was allowed, Adi and Rhoda would sit in front of Merwan and joke, "Come on, Merwan, twitch your nose so we can send a telegram to Baba!" But Merwan would reply, "Then I will also cable Baba that you made me do it."

Once in Guruprasad, Adi Dubash was playing cards with Baba. He was dealing and dealt Baba a very good hand. Baba inquired, "Have you given me these cards on the sly? Did you deal crookedly?" Adi admitted that he had dealt from the bottom of the deck. So Baba gently twisted his ear, and though he had not applied much pressure Adi's ear pained for several hours.

On, 26 May 1963, few persons returned to Guruprasad. Baba told everyone present to take his darshan. Rhoda Dubash put her head on Baba's feet three times: once for herself; once for her husband Adi; and once for their five-year-old son Homi, who had fallen out of a window and died eight years before.

Sarosh and Viloo's son, Merwan, returned from England and was to be married to Anita, his Swiss fiancée. One day he and Sarosh came to Guruprasad, and Merwan said, "Baba, I want your blessings on my wedding day." Baba gestured, "Granted," and instructed that after the wedding in Ahmednagar, the bride and groom, and Sarosh and Viloo should come to Guruprasad to see him.

The wedding was held on Thursday, 27 June 1963. That day, Baba asked Eruch to phone Sarosh and find out how the preparations were going. Irritated, Sarosh shouted over the telephone, "Tell Baba it is raining cats and dogs here! We've had to change the wedding arrangements to inside." When Eruch related this, Baba just listened and did not comment.

The next morning, the wedding party came to Guruprasad. Among those seated before Baba were Adi and Rhoda Dubash. After the usual greetings, Baba asked Viloo and Sarosh about the wedding. Viloo complained, "Baba, it rained so much!"

Baba replied, "Well, your son asked for my blessing and I gave it to him." Turning to Rhoda Dubash, he gestured towards her and said, "Ask her what happened on her wedding day."

A similar incident had happened to Rhoda at the time of her wedding in 1945 in Pakistan. She did not believe in Baba then and had issued a challenge to him, saying in her heart: "If you are what they say you are, you will send me heaven's blessings on my wedding day!" And likewise, it had poured down rain that day. But Rhoda had never mentioned this incident or her challenge to Baba! That day in Guruprasad, when Baba addressed her, she was so taken by surprise, she could only gape. In her heart she had known it was Baba who had sent his blessings on her wedding day, but now God Himself was confirming it.

Eruch said, "Well Rhoda, what happened on your wedding day? We are waiting." Rhoda began to narrate the story and while she was speaking, Baba interrupted to remind her, "You did not tell them that, after throwing this challenge at me, you completely forgot about it until after the wedding," which was indeed true. (All talks ©2016 Mandali Hall Talks)

Adi Dubash had had to return to Karachi for work, but Rhoda and their son Merwan remained in Poona, coming to Guruprasad daily. Rhoda was enlisted to help type correspondence, and would work in a small room adjoining the hall. One day, from his chair, Baba noticed her and, moving his fingers, he mimicked her typing. Sometimes, Mehera would invite Rhoda to have lunch with Baba and them. Baba would on occasion tease Rhoda Dubash about her being a notoriously slow eater. When she was having lunch with Baba on 27 June 1965, handing her a large sliced mango, Baba asked her to finish it in no less than five minutes. At first Rhoda took it as a joke, but Baba motioned, "Now, only four minutes are left. Hurry!" Seeing that he was serious, Rhoda began eating the fruit as fast as she could. "Now only one minute is left!" Baba indicated. So Rhoda shoved the remaining pieces into her mouth, and Baba clapped. The other women laughed uproariously at her swollen cheeks, and Baba gestured to her, "Now go into the next room and slowly chew what you have in your mouth."

 

15- DUBASH NAIZE

(Mother of Minoo Kharas)

On Saturday, 26 December 1942, the out-of-town lovers began arriving at Meherabad for the meeting.

Minoo Kharas of Karachi had brought a close relative, Naize Dubash, to whom Baba gave a ring, telling her never to remove it. It was a special gift as that day was Naize's birthday! (Lord Meher-p-2310-1942)

Minoo Kharas and Naize Dubash met Baba on 30 December 1945, at Khushru Quarters. Baba arrived in a car driven by Sarosh and took Minoo and Naize to Meherazad. Baba was pleased to see that Naize was still wearing a ring he had given her during a previous meeting and told her never to remove it. While Naize was with the women mandali, Baba again confirmed to Minoo that he was a member of the Avatar's circle and repeated his promise to give Minoo God-realization. (Lord   Meher-p-2456-1945)

Minoo Kharas, Naize Dubash and her 25-year-old daughter-in-law Rhoda were permitted to see Baba at Meherabad on the 27th and 28th December 1945. Rhoda Dubash's story is interesting. Naize Dubash was a devoted lover of Meher Baba, but her family — especially her husband — was antagonistic towards Baba. She used to sneak away to visit Baba whenever she had the opportunity, and she had always taught her children that Meher Baba was God. Rhoda, on the other hand, had no faith in Baba whatsoever. In 1944, she was engaged to marry Naize's son, Adi. When Rhoda found out that he was a Baba lover, she was shocked. But she decided to go through with the wedding because she loved Adi and was sure her love could draw him away from "this Meher Baba person." Meanwhile Minoo Kharas (Adi's cousin) and Adi's mother would constantly talk to her about Baba and, since Rhoda was the prospective daughter-in-law, etiquette demanded that she listen — though she was not interested or impressed. (Lord Meher-p-2517-1945)

On Friday, 31 December 1949, Baba gave darshan in the morning in a decorated room at Khushru Quarters, Ahmednagar. Many from Bombay, Nagpur Bpmbay and other out-of-town close followers were present, as well as about 400 from Ahmednagar

Others among the Karachi group included Gulu and Khorshed Shroff; Minoo Kharas' fiancée Freiny and her father Kaikhushru Patel; Minoo's sister, Dina Patel; Mr. and Mrs. Mahiar Dubash; Burjor Rajkotwalla and his daughter Dolly Arjani; and Adi Dubash's mother Naize. (Lord Meher-p-2691-1949)

Baba and the women finally flew to Paris on Thursday afternoon, 21 August 1952, via Air France 437, and Air France 180 to Karachi. Their flight landed in Karachi at 9:00 P.M. the next night. Only Minoo Kharas had been called to the airport in Karachi, but with him had come Adi Dubash, and also Minoo's fiancée Freni Patel. Minoo alone went forward to greet Baba. Reservations for Baba's group to India were difficult to obtain, but Minoo pointed out that Adi could possibly arrange it, as he worked in shipping.

Baba and the women finally flew to Paris on Thursday afternoon, 21 August 1952, via Air France 437, and Air France 180 to Karachi. Their flight landed in Karachi at 9:00 P.M. the next night. Only Minoo Kharas had been called to the airport in Karachi, but with him had come Adi Dubash, and also Minoo's fiancée Freni Patel. Minoo alone went forward to greet Baba. Reservations for Baba's group to India were difficult to obtain, but Minoo pointed out that Adi could possibly arrange it, as he worked in shipping.

Baba was pleased. Baba and the women were accommodated in rooms at the airport. Minoo kept watch outside Baba's door during the night. The next morning, Adi was called again and instructed to arrange for their plane tickets. His mother Naize, his wife Rhoda and their two small boys, along with Pilamai were also permitted darshan. Somehow, Adi procured four seats on a small plane to India, so Baba left for Bombay with Mehera, Mani and Goher. Meheru and Rano followed on the next available flight the following day. Baba landed in Bombay at 6:10 P.M. on 23 August 1952 and was driven straight to Meherazad. (Lord Meher-p-3129-1952)

 

18-HOMI DESAI

Homi Desai of Lahore came for Baba's darshan. He came after several years and was eager to lay some of his problems before Baba. But on seeing him, Baba stated, "Homi, just sit here quietly for five minutes and then leave." Desai sat down, but his mind was in turmoil. After five minutes Baba asked him to go, and he left highly disappointed. He thought that he had lost his chance, but Baba sent someone with a message to tell him to come the next day. The whole night he kept awake, worries filling his mind. He appeared the next morning, but Baba again told him to keep quiet and leave after five minutes. Desai flushed with anger, but Baba asked him to come again the following day.

The third day, deeply troubled, Desai arrived at Guruprasad. His eyes were red from lack of sleep and his mind was churning. "Sit here for five minutes and don't say anything," Baba stated. "Then go."

At first Baba took no notice of him, but the next moment when Baba gazed at him, his clouded mind cleared and inwardly he received the sought-after answers to his questions. Greatly heartened, Desai folded his hands and said to Baba, "Thank You," and then exclaimed, "What a butcher You are to slaughter one so slowly!"

Baba replied with a smile, "Only slow butchering leads one to the Goal. A quick end keeps you where you are."

 

19-IRANI ARDESHIR

Ardeshir Irani and his friend Feram of Karachi came to meet Baba, and presented fruit and sweets to him. Baba discussed with Ardeshir about planting a fruit orchard at Meherabad, similar to the ones he had seen in Persia, and told him, "If you were to begin an orchard here, my men would have employment." Ardeshir was quite prepared to begin such work and, from that day, began living at Meherabad as one of the mandali. Baba designated him "Director of Agriculture" and advised him to begin immediately to fertilize and improve the soil for the orchard.

Ardeshir had been introduced to the Master at Manzil-e-Meem through Baidul, and even at that time he was eager to stay with the Master. Baba had assured him he would call him later, and on this day Baba fulfilled that promise. However, the mandali were not so thrilled with this new addition to their ranks. Ardeshir, being a hearty Irani, was a harsh taskmaster. This newly-appointed Director of Agriculture literally worked the mandali to a breaking point. He worked them so hard that Ramjoo wondered how many of them would live to see the orchard blooming — much less survive to taste its fruit. (Lord Meher pp-510-1954)

 

22-IRANI HORMUZD BOMAN & PILAMAI

Baba was in a good mood when they arrived in Karachi on 31 May 1923. Pilamai's husband Hormuzd, Baily, and other devotees were waiting at the station to welcome them. Baily's sister Khorshed had moved to Karachi, and Baba had sent him ahead to assist with travel arrangements. Baba rode to Pilamai's house in a Victoria and relaxed there. Within a few days, Karachi residents who already knew of Meher Baba came for his darshan.

Pilamai made everyone comfortable in her home. Later, she guided Baba and the mandali on a sightseeing excursion to places of interest in Karachi. One day Baba went to visit his maternal aunt and uncle, Banu Masi and Khodadad Masa, who had moved there from Bombay. Afterward Baba visited Baily's sister's home. (Lord Meher-p-423-1923)

 

29-KHODADAD MASA & BANU MASI

Baba's maternal aunt Banu Masi arrived at Meherabad from Karachi on 13 June. She met with her two sons, Merwan and Homi, who were studying in the Meher Ashram School and felt happy to find them doing well. She left for Bombay in the evening. Dhake returned to his duties that day. (Lord Meher-p-824-1927)

On the night of 21st September 1931, the ship arrived in Karachi. Baba and the mandali were met by Pilamai, Baba's maternal aunt Banu Masi, and Merwan and Homi, her two sons who had been at the Meher Ashram School. The most distinguished among the others waiting to receive them was the mayor of Karachi, Jamshed N. R. Mehta. Pilamai invited Baba to her house and he went there at 11:30 P.M., accompanied by Buasaheb and Vishnu.

Baba met with people until two in the morning, giving a discourse on divine love to Jamshed Mehta, 43, and praising the selfless service he was doing in Karachi to assist the downtrodden classes and lepers. Baba then stated:

Real worship is within — inside the heart — not in the outward muttering of words. To enter the spiritual path, one has to go beyond religious ceremonies. One cannot grasp Truth through the intellect, but, at present, people are averse to know even an iota of it!

All the disorder of the world is due to the mind. He who conquers it, conquers everything and is a real hero.

Banu Masi had not been feeling well, so Baba made arrangements in Karachi for an operation she needed and instructed his cousin Merwan to attend to her. His other cousin, Homi, wished to stay with Baba permanently. Baba gave him no answer then, but asked him to remind him about it on his return from Persia.  (Lord Meher-p-l1092-1929)

Baba bid farewell to his close followers in Karachi — Nariman, Pilamai, Banu Masi, and others — and left by train for Bombay on Wednesday, 26 August 1931, (Lord Meher-p-1232-1931)

 

30-KHORSHED BANU PATASKIA

On 15 May 1927, Khorshedbanu Pastakia and Pilamai along with a few boys from Karachi arrived at Meherabad to stay in the ashram for some days. The boys had been living in Karachi and were brought to Meherabad to study in the school. (Lord Meher-p- 810-1927)

 

34- MAVALVALA-ZARINA T.

One fateful dinner in 1968, my brother entreated me to give my soul another chance! He asked me to remove the Beloved's picture from the wall, store all my Baba literature out of sight, go to no more Baba meetings, resume wearing the customary sadra-kusti which I had discarded and begin attending all the traditional Zoroastrian prayers, ceremonies and such.

In short, I was to become an orthodox Zoroastrian for six months, completely forgetting about Baba, at which point my brother was sure that it would be a case of "out of sight, out of mind."

I bargained with him that I would do all he asked except for taking Baba's picture down from the wall. I had taken to heart the advice given me by Freny and dear Arnavaz that I should think well before putting up a picture of Baba in my room, for once up, I should never take it down. But my brother was relentless, and though it troubled my heart to take the beautiful picture down, I finally gave in and agreed to all his conditions.

After all, I thought, this was an opportunity my Beloved was giving me to test my faith — would my lukewarm love suddenly be kindled into an undying flame, would my uncertainty of His Godhood be dispelled to be replaced by doubtless, heartfelt conviction?

As long as He chose to reside in my heart, what need had I for all the external trimmings (except for that one beloved picture!)? Didn't "absence makes the heart grow fonder" too? So, despite the turmoil within me and anticipating sleepless nights, with a heavy heart I promised to start the "masquerade" from the next morning.

However, the Infinitely Compassionate One had other plans. Round about 11 o'clock that very night the telephone rang. As I was still awake, I got up to answer it.

It was a dear old Baba lover, who apologized for disturbing the sleeping household at that late hour, but he dared to call because he thought I would want to hear without any delay Beloved Baba's cable that he had just received and been instructed to convey to all in Karachi. And lo and behold! What was the message of the cable?

LOVE MAKES THE FORMLESS AND INFINITE
BECOME ENFORMED AND FINITE
AS THE GOD-MAN AMONG MEN.

LOVE ME MORE AND MORE BECAUSE
FOR THE SAKE OF LOVE
I HAVE COME AMONG YOU.

— MEHER BABA

My heart knew then that He knew my heart, for who else but the All-knowing God could have such perfect timing? Not even one sleepless night! With tranquillity of heart, I fell at His Feet for the saving grace He had bestowed upon me — I would never, ever take down His picture now!

When he takes over, pp. 59-60, ed. Bal Natu, 1988 © Avatar Meher Baba Perpetual Public Charitable Trust

Freny Dadachanji's sister, Zarine Mavalwala, also came for the darshan from Karachi. Zarine had love for Baba but did not yet fully believe him to be God-incarnate. On one occasion, when the Bombay women were with Baba, Zarine began having dreadful thoughts of doubt about him. Suddenly addressing her, Baba remarked, "Don't be afraid of skepticism. I am purposely creating it to clear your mind of it. I am God personified! Is it not true, Zarine?" Zarine shyly kept quiet, but then and there accepted Baba wholeheartedly as the Avatar. (Lord Meher-p-5154-1965)

 

35-MEHTA JAMSHED N. R.

(Mayor of Karachi)

On the night of 21st September, 1929, the ship arrived in Karachi. Baba and the mandali were met by Pilamai, Baba's maternal aunt Banu Masi, and Merwan and Homi, her two sons who had been at the Meher Ashram School. The most distinguished among the others waiting to receive them was the mayor of Karachi, Jamshed N. R. Mehta. Pilamai invited Baba to her house and Baba went there in night.

Baba met with people until two in the morning, giving a discourse on divine love to Jamshed Mehta and praising the selfless service he was doing in Karachi to assist the downtrodden classes and lepers. Baba then stated:

Real worship is within — inside the heart — not in the outward muttering of words. To enter the spiritual path, one has to go beyond religious ceremonies. One cannot grasp Truth through the intellect, but, at present, people are averse to know even an iota of it!

All the disorder of the world is due to the mind. He, who conquers it, conquers everything and is a real hero. (Lord Meher-1092-1929)

On April 30th, 1931 Jamshed Mehta, the mayor of Karachi, came to see Baba. Baba praised his sincere efforts and sympathetic treatment of the poor and needy, and admired his selfless service in other areas as well. Baba explained to him:

I am very pleased with your sincere work and selfless service, particularly in the cause of the really poor and needy. You render it with a sense of renunciation, even at the cost of sacrificing your own interests. I know all about your activities in the cause of service to others, and they are unique and most praiseworthy. You are sincere and selfless as very few persons in the world in your position could be.

In spite of all these sincere humanitarian efforts in the cause of service to others, God-Realization is far, far away. The ego will not die so easily. It is most difficult for the ego to disappear, and disappear it must before God-Realization is possible.

Even in the noblest aspirants and the sincerest workers for the good of humanity, the thought that "I did this" or "I have done that" exists. Although they might not say this openly to others, the thought persists in their minds. This very thought that "I have done this service" is so destructive that it nullifies all the service rendered and robs it of all value and worth.

Jamshed Mehta was highly impressed with Baba's explanation and his heart accepted the truth of the Master's words. To Mehta's surprise, Baba visited the slums of Karachi and Manora with him that evening. (Lord Meher-p-1365)

(It was on Jamshed Mehta's suggestion that Gandhiji's first meeting with Meher Baba took place on the ship S.S. Rajputana.)

 

36-MERWAN DUBASH

Son of Adi and Roda Dubash of Karachi (Pakistan)

Following is the extract of contacts with Baba in his own word of Meherwan Dubash as written by H P Bharucha in his book Glimpses of Guruprasad.

I am son of Adi and Roda Dubash of Karachi, Pakistan. When Baba was informed about my birth in 1947, He sent a cable by return, naming me Merwan.

In May and June 1960, I spent the first of my 3 long stays with Baba. We were in Poona about five to six weeks and went to Baba every day at Guruprasad. First my mother and I went only in the mornings and my father alone went back after lunch in the afternoon.

I was only thirteen and started to get bored after a week or so of this and was agitating to go to Panchgani. At the right opportunity, my parents asked Baba if it was OK for me to go to Panchgani. In His usual fashion, Baba asked, “Why does he want to go? Doesn’t He like it here? And because Baba asked, my parents, said that I was getting restless and a little bored. Baba said, in this case, they should let me come with Adi (my father) in the afternoon to Guruprasad. You notice He didn’t say no to going to Panchgani. So I started going to Guruprasad with my dad in the afternoon as well, thinking that I was now going to be doubly bored. Of course, what I didn’t know was that the afternoon was more fun.

This was also the first time I met the twins, Rustom and Sohrab and Merwan Mistry. In the afternoon the four of us would amuse ourselves before Baba came back from women mandali. We must have been making quite a racket doing this because Baba got word that we were disturbing Pendu, who would take a nap every afternoon before Baba returned to the men side. Others told us to keep the noise down, and I guess we didn’t     because one day Baba told us that we were making too much noise and disturbing the Pendu’s sleep. Therefore, between 12.00 and 2.00 all four of us were told to keep silence in Guruprasad, which I did for the rest of my stay. Of course in the afternoon Baba also played His famous card game of La Risque. Initially, I did play but picked up the cards and dealt with them after each game, and after a while Baba let me graduate the player level.

In the afternoons we also had Aloba’s famous tea. Also, very often Baba receives baskets of mangoes from His lovers as a gift, and there were so many that he would regularly distribute them to us to eat. Baba would sit on a stool on the side varandah or kitchen and give the mangoes individually to each one. Then there were also the house visits when Baba would visit lover’s house in Poona at their invitation. He not only took the men mandali but took two or three carloads of people with Him.

In atypical fashion, Baba would make sure everyone got a chance to go. He would take an interest in making the selections as to    who was going on which visit and in which car. House visit were great fun to go on, and we tucked in heartily in the goodies that were laid out for Baba. Baba Himself would only have a cup of tea and very little to eat, but His entrounge did justice    to the rest! Of course, all this was great fun for a boy of thirteen, and now that I was spending all day with Baba, the desire to go to Panchgani was no longer there.

However, there were still, let’s say, a few moments that were less fun. For example, every Sunday Baba would allow the local people from Poona and Bombay to have His darshan. Inevitably these lovers would sing song for Baba. Quite a few of them sang classical Indian songs and played classical music, and not being fan of Indian music, I was not particularly enthralled. I would survive the morning session, but halfway through the afternoon session, it would be a struggle to stay awake! He merely came down to my level and kept me interested in activities around Him-truly a demonstration of His humanness.

There is also a message in this story of youngsters, which is that if you feel bored when you are at Meherabad or Meherazad, don’t worry, don’t feel guilty or think that something is wrong; it happens   to most kids, but Baba eventually takes care of that.

In 1960, during this stay at Guruprasad, I experienced one my major incident with Baba; we had started using rented bicycle for transportation to Guruprasad every day. Each day we would cycle   there in the morning, back home for lunch, and then back to Guruprasad. One morning as we entered Guruprasad I was told by someone that the mandali ladies had noticed that I cycled very fast and I should slow down, as Baba would not like it, I was warned but son forgot about it.

One day in the afternoon on way to Guruprasad after lunch, as my father and I were bicycling through one of the crowded side of street of Poona, a car appeared from nowhere at some speed with horn blaring. I a hurry to move over one side, I lost the presence of mind, and instead of pulling over to left (which is the side to drive in India) I pulled over the right, across the path of the oncoming car. Apparently, the car missed me by a whisker. After I had composed myself, we    cycled over to Guruprasad, parked our bikes, and noticed that Baba was already in the Mandali Hall.

As soon as we put our foot into the room, Baba looked over at my father and asked, “How well does Merwan ride a cycle?” Of course, my dad just needed an excuse, and he quickly blurted out what had happened that afternoon. Baba became quite serious (not angry), and my father’s complaints had finished, He looked at me and said, “Don’t I have anything better to do than keep My nazar on you? From now on your bicycle riding stops.” I was instructed by Baba that I should return the rented bike that evening and from then on was not to ride a bicycle. Being only thirteen, I asked if this meant no cycling when I went back to Karachi, and Baba said, “No cycling when you are in India, You can cycle in Karachi,” That was the end of this incident with Baba.

However, we found out afterwards that for some days before the incident Baba had regularly been asking Aloba, “How does Merwan ride his bicycle?” Of  course, Aloba was the one on gate duty, so he used to see me riding into the Guruprasad  and told Baba that most kids of my age. I rode a little fast and showed off a bit. Apparently, Baba asked the same question regularly for some days before the incident.

There is a sequel story. In 1962 I finished school and went to university. The only convenient transportation to get me to university and back was bicycle. When I asked my parents to buy me one, they hesitated. Even though Baba had said I could bicycle in Karachi, they were reluctant to buy one for me without Baba’s permission. So in 1963, when we were with Baba again in Guruprasad, at the opportunate time Baba was asked whether I could use bicycle in Karachi to go back and forth to university. Baba, after some discussion, said it was Ok for me to have a bicycle for my own in Karachi, but I was still not to ride a bike in India. So even today, although I can ride a bicycle anywhere in the world, have one in Toronto, I do not ride in India. (Glimpses of Guruprasad –p-159-162)

 CONTACTD-PAKISTAN

 

38-MINOO KHARAS (MAINOCHAR)

(Close Disciple)

Refer: Fortunate Souls- Vol 2 sl. No. 70

 

39-MINOO POHOWALA N.

(From Karachi)

On 27th May 1928, while all mandali were getting ready in the packing to move ashram to Toka (Rajasthan) Minoo N. Pohowala and two other Baba livers desiring to join the ashram, arrived. Baba permitted them to stay in Meherabad for a few days so they could acquaint themselves with the mandali and become familiar with the various work. (Lord Meher-p-929-1928)

On 2nd June 1928, the day before leaving Meherabad, Baba met privately with Minoo Pohowala. As Minoo was in the habit of going to one saint after another, Baba pointedly explained to him:

When you sink a well, you first select a spot before beginning the drilling. But if you stop drilling halfway and start anew at a different spot, you will never find water and all your labours will be wasted. But if you keep drilling at one spot, you will surely find water eventually. A spirit of fortitude is required. If you are easily disappointed and keep trying at different places, you will never succeed.

Similarly, if you continue running from one saint or Sadguru to another, you will never gain anything. Stick firmly to only one Master and carry out his wishes. Dig, dig, and keep on digging, and one day you will get the water of Realization.

On 30th June 1928, Minoo Pohowala came to Toka (Rajasthan) and others from Bombay, Quetta and few foreigners.

On 10th July 1928, the third anniversary of the Master's silence was celebrated. Minoo Pohowala also came. At two in the afternoon, Baba's feet were washed and the mandali and boys gave him a bath. The daily singing of the Gujarati arti composed by Baba, Bujaave Naar, began from that day. As prasad, Baba distributed sweets and tea to all.

On the 22nd December 1928, Minoo Pohowala, his brother visited Meherabad,

On 1st March 1929, Minoo Pohowala and Nadir Dastur came to Meherabad at noon. Baba discussed some work. Minoo returned on the 4th.

On the 14th July 1930, Baba left Meherabad for Nasik where he stayed at Rustom's home. Baba stayed in Nasik for more than a month. However, during this time, he kept to himself; except for the men and women mandali and a few close lovers, he saw no one. No outsiders were permitted. Among those infrequent visitors who did see him was Minoo Pohowala one among others.

On 20th August 1930, Baba left Nasik for a visit to Calcutta with three mandali men and Agha Ali. Meanwhile, Minoo Pohowala had arranged for the men mandali's stay in Bijapur, and all 22 of them, including those still fasting, left Nasik for Bijapur on 21st August. The mandali were instructed by Baba to remain there until the end of October.

On 21st February 1933, Baba wished to go to Kolhapur along with boys for whom a new twelve-ton bus driven by a driver was hired for Baba and others. An older Chevrolet bus to be driven by another driver was sent by Minoo Pohowala for the mandali.

On 7th March 1930, Baba left Horikan for Mangalore in the afternoon. After arriving there, a telegram was sent to Minoo Pohowala at Bijapur, informing him that Baba had accepted his invitation and that they were on their way. They spent the night at Mangalore and the next day, they took a drive and walked around the town, along the seashore, and to the seaport. They departed after buying newspapers at the railway station. It was the start of an eventful day the mandali would never forget.

On 9th March 1930, Baba with group reached Hubli having driven through Shimoga, Honnali, and Harihar. The next day, they received two telegrams; one was from Minoo Pohowala concerning financial matters, without acknowledging receipt of Baba's previous telegram about Baba's decision to visit Bijapur.

Baba asked, "Should we go to Bijapur or not?" They discussed the alternative of visiting Panchgani, but due to Kalemama's difficulties with arranging matters at Panchgani, it was eventually decided to go on to Bijapur.

On the evening of the 10th March 1930, they reached Minoo's Meher Motor Works in Bijapur where Minoo received them warmly. A darshan was held and they had a fine moonlit drive after dinner to a lake.

On 30th March 1930, Minoo Pohowala and others came to Nasik to see Baba who expounded on the nature of love to them.

On 7th September 1930, Baba left Kolhapur and arrived in Bijapur, where he met up with other members of the mandali. According to Baba's instructions, four of mandali men broke their long fast on 4th September. Only Pleader and Bala Tambat were instructed to continue fasting.  Every evening, people would throng to him for darshan and sing his arti. Baba would also give discourses, and many in Bijapur tasted the Master's wine and felt his divine love. Minoo Pohowala had made comfortable arrangements for Baba and the mandali, and Baba's stay there was a happy occasion.

On 26th August 1933,

A meeting was held there was a talk of constructing a few new buildings at Meherabad, but if it were later decided to stay in Nasik permanently, then constructing buildings in Meherabad would be a waste of money and energy. Minoo Pohowala came on the 26th from Bijapur to meet Baba, for the first time in three years.

On 23rd May 1934, in the room on the back verandah of the Mess Quarters at lower Meherabad, Baba began dictating the "Theory of Creation" for the first time. Baba would dictate on the alphabet board, which Jalbhai or Chanji would read. Feram Workingboxwala would take it down in shorthand and later type it out. Minoo Pohowala was present and listened.

In June of 1939, Baba was again residing at Meherabad after a six-month absence. Many came to see him on 4th June including Minoo Pohowala and others and families.

In year 1953, Baba divided the 99 men into two groups, "A" and "B." He had the names of the "A" group read out and told them to remain seated.

"But before you all disperse," Baba stated, "I want you to remember three important things: First, I do not want any monetary help from any of you.

"Secondly, you need not worry, be anxious or lose your peace of mind over what I might ask you to do. I know what each one of you can do and so will instruct accordingly.

"But, and this is the third point, I will use to the utmost the capabilities of each of you."

In Group B, consisting of the following 22 men Minoo Pohowala was one.

On 1st June 1948, Baba and the women were driven to Meherabad. Baba got out at lower Meherabad and the women were driven up the hill. The opening ceremony for the new hall at lower Meherabad took place by Baba taking his seat inside and the mandali performing arti before him. Baba then went up the hill. Baba returned to lower Meherabad in morning and began giving interviews to those who had come, including Minoo Pohowala and the Poona Theosophical group.

On the morning of 23rd July 1948, a one-hour darshan was held at lower Meherabad in the new hall. Baba arrived at Meherabad quite early with three mandali women. Baba was garlanded. About 250 Baba lovers from Sholapur, Barsi, Poona, Bombay and Ahmednagar arrived that morning at nine o'clock, after their train stopped at Meherabad to let them descend. Minoo Kharas and Minoo Pohowala (now business partners) had come from Karachi. Baba met each group individually, though they were not allowed to take his darshan or ask questions.

On 16th September 1948, Baba came to live at Meherazad with ladies mandali women. On the 18th, Minoo Pohowala, with four mandali men came to Meherabad, and Baba went to see them at noon. (The meeting was in relation to Nariman opening a business office in Karachi, with Kharas and Pohowala's help.

In Mahabaleshwar, Baba's health was suffering, and the mandali insisted he take some treatment Minoo Pohowala and Minoo Kharas came to Mahabaleshwar around the 18th with Meherjee. They were particularly anxious, since he was to leave shortly to give mass darshan — a physically demanding task even when Baba was in the best of health. Close mandali men prevailed upon Baba to return to Bombay for medical treatment, to which Baba agreed on one condition: "I am ready to go on condition that from the day I begin taking treatment, you all remain beside me awake without a wink of sleep."

Ivy O. Duce wrote about Minoo in her book “How a Master works.”

Minoo had difficult order he had ever received from Meher Baba came at the beginning of the New Life. That order was that Minoo was not to lay eyes on Baba during this period (he had been accepted as one of those who was to remain behind but obey implicitly). If he were to lay eyes on his Master at any time, at any place, he was not to acknowledge Baba in any way. He could not speak his name or speak to him or even look upon him. If this ever happened, he was to immediately leave that place.

Minoo told Baba that he didn't believe that he could ever carry out this order, but Baba said to him, “you must!”

Many months elapsed, and Minoo, like many others, longed for just a glimpse of his beloved Baba. In the second year of the separation, one day in Delhi near the railroad station, Minoo looked up as he rounded a corner to see none other than Baba standing near the platform with the men disciples. He remembered his order from Baba, and with great difficulty he did not cast his eyes upon Baba but fled from the spot. (As Minoo told me this, one could see his heart breaking anew, though it had been many, years before)

Because of the work he had to do in the city, he remained there to spend the night. He chose a hotel that he had known and retired early, trying not to give way to the sorrow in his heart in not being able to even touch or speak to Baba. During the evening, a knock came at his door and someone inquired if he knew where Meher Baba was staying-that he had been told he was in Delhi and wished to see him. Minoo replied that he did not know Baba’s whereabouts. He then went to bed and tried to sleep, but he could not. He wept all night long. The next day he went back to the work Baba had assigned him, and it was not until many months later that Minoo learned an astonishing fact. On the same night that he lay in the hotel, crying for the love of Baba, his beloved Baba lay on a bed in the next room against the same wall that divided them, for Baba had decided for his own reasons to remain overnight in a hotel right next door to the hotel in which Minoo stayed. So all the time, he wept. Baba was lying near to him. What a demonstration of love and example of why our faith is so important. (How a Master works-pp 544-545)

 

 41-MUHAMMAD IQBAL

On the train travelling from Lahore to Amritsar, a 53-year-old Muslim man in the compartment was also visibly drawn to Baba. He kept gazing steadily at Baba, who was patting the new boy seated beside him. After some time, Baba looked straight at him and dictated through one of the mandali, "My friend, there is nothing but bliss everywhere."

"Maybe for you, Sir," the man replied, "but not for us."

Baba answered, "You complain because you cannot see it, but I tell you there is nothing but bliss all around. I see it; I experience it every moment."

The man then said, "I have experienced nothing but misery, conflict and suffering in the world.

I have never known happiness and am quite disgusted with my life."

"This is because of ignorance," Baba explained. "You have no experience of real bliss. You run after the shadow, losing the substance. You mistook happiness for eating, making money, and in pleasures and enjoyments, which are fleeting, false and transitory. Not only that, they take you further away from the real bliss which is everlasting."

"But, where can I find that bliss?" asked the man. "And how does one find it?"

"That is exactly the point!" Baba exclaimed. "Now you are asking and desiring something real. Let your desire be only to find this bliss, to find Truth and to find God. Continuously have this longing and you will achieve it. You will find the path to achieve it, and someone will surely show it to you."

"Would you show it to me?" the man pleaded. "Would you help me?"

"Certainly, with the greatest pleasure. That is what I want to do. That is my work; that is my mission. I will show you what real bliss is only if you do as I say, and I will not tell you to do something too difficult for you. It is so easy, if you only take it to heart. I will then see to the rest.

"Every morning, very early, spare only five minutes for this. Seek a place, aloof and alone, and try to meditate, thinking, 'God is One; He is everywhere and there is nothing but Him.' Do this for only five minutes daily. I will see that you experience something. You will see some light, and then you will be satisfied and proceed on the Path."

The man was visibly relieved of his misery, and felt joy from meeting the Master and accepting his advice. Baba's simple explanation made him experience that life was again worth living. The feeling of renewed enthusiasm for life had not been conveyed through words; it had been imparted internally.

The mandali found out that the person had tried many different spiritual austerities and was searching for a Master, but after years he had grown dejected and depressed. When he met Baba in the train, he was contemplating suicide. Baba not only saved his life, but inspired him to continue in his quest. This individual was none other than the celebrated Indian poet Muhammad Iqbal.

Previously, in 1930 while travelling by train from Lahore to Amritsar, Baba and the mandali had struck up a conversation with a fellow passenger who appeared to be in despair. After their talk, however, the man was much heartened and grateful to Baba for his advice. The person turned out to be none other than Muhammad Iqbal, the celebrated Indian poet and philosopher. Iqbal was a towering figure among pre-independence Muslim intellectuals, and it was therefore with much sadness that Ramjoo and Ghani heard the news of Iqbal's passing on 21 April 1938 at the age of 61.

The next day, they were to visit Baba in Panchgani, but they were so preoccupied with other matters to be discussed that when they arrived they completely forgot about Iqbal's demise. But, pointing to one of the hairs on his head, the first thing Baba dictated on the board to them were the Urdu words, "Mera ek baal gaya," meaning, "I have lost one of my hairs." For some moments Ramjoo and Ghani looked blank, and it was only when Baba repeated what he had dictated and added, "Don't you fellows understand?" that they caught Baba's use of the words ek baal (one hair) rhyming with Iqbal. Baba had expressed his sense of loss, but also the insignificance of it by comparing it to the loss of a hair. (Lord Meher-p-1916-1938)

 

 

46-SAIB ASMI

Saib Asmi came for Baba darshan in 1958 sahwas.

While giving darshan and embracing the women, Baba's eyes roved throughout the pandal. Saib Asmi, who was dazed, absorbed in his experience of Baba's love, was seated next to Ramjoo Abdulla. Baba asked Ramjoo, "What is going on by your side?" Ramjoo was already aware of Saib Asmi's condition.

Baba asked Ramjoo if Sahib Asmi had eaten lunch. Ramjoo said he would have food in the evening. Again, he asked Ramjoo if Sahib Asmi would eat a little fruit. Through Ramjoo, Asmi said he would eat in the evening.

Even while giving darshan and embracing the women, Baba's eyes roved throughout the pandal. Saib Asmi, who was dazed, absorbed in his experience of Baba's love, was seated next to Ramjoo Abdulla. Baba asked Ramjoo, "What is going on by your side?" Ramjoo was already aware of Saib Asmi's condition.

When Baba came onto the dais, the poet Saib Asmi was asked to sit on Baba's right. Baba asked Ramjoo if Asmi had slept in Baba's cabin. Ramjoo replied that he had slept in another room. Introducing him, Baba observed:

This is Saib Asmi. He is a resident of Lahore and a famous Pakistani poet. He has not met me before and this is the first time he has come to Meherabad. Yet, he has written a book in Urdu, Sarod-e-Javidan, which is dedicated to me. In the book, he has devoted about 100 pages to my life as much as he knows about it and has composed poems about me. He has introduced me to the Muslim world as Saheb-e-Zaman [the Messiah]. All this from a Muslim who has not seen me before and that, too, in a land [Pakistan] where people do not believe in the conception of man becoming God. I know he has taken this courageous step out of his deep love for me, and that sort of daring and love pleases me most.

Eruch was interpreting Baba's hand signs and conveying them in English, and Keshav Nigam was translating them into Hindi. By mistake, Keshav introduced Saib Asmi to the gathering as "Saheb-e-Zaman Asmi," creating a burst of laughter.

Baba declared, "Saib Asmi is not Saheb-e-Zaman, but Keshav has mistakenly said so. Someday, in one of his future births, Asmi may become (Qutub] Saheb-e-Zaman)" This elicited loud cheers of "Avatar Meher Baba ki jai!" and the pandal resounded with the cries.

Keshav then apologized for his mistake, saying that only Meher Baba was the Saheb-e-Zaman. Saib Asmi laid his head on Baba's feet, and Baba warmly embraced him. Again there was loud cheering.