MIRABAI

MIRABAI

(Women Saint Krishna Era)

An Indian woman devotee came to see Baba at Meherabad on Sunday, 28 October 1934. She complained openly before Baba that she wished to stop having sexual intercourse with her husband because of her desire to see God. But her husband was unwilling.

Consoling her, Baba explained, "It is better to treat your husband with love and affection, even if you dislike and do not wish to indulge in intercourse because of your spiritual aspiration and desire to love God. It is good to have no sexual desires, but when it comes to a question of duty, you must sacrifice a little of your interest and please your husband.

"Keep your mind focused toward God and give your body to your husband. You needn't worry. Just try to do as I advise.

These remaining sanskaras must be finished before the Experience is given. Remember Mirabai's sacrifice and how she suffered. Be like her."

Mira was one of Meher Baba's favorite saints and her story is famous in India:

Mira was a Hindu born around 1498 in the village of Kurkhi, Rajasthan. She was married to a Rajasthan king, but she was so absorbed in devotion to Krishna, she had no attachment to her husband (who was killed in a battle when Mira was in her late twenties) or to his kingdom. She would compose songs in praise of Krishna and then leave the palace to sing them to the common people. The new king and his family considered it degrading, but she did not care.

Once, the royal family was so upset they plotted to kill her. They placed a cobra in Mira's flower basket. When she opened the basket to garland Krishna's statue, the cobra had been transformed into flowers. In another attempt to murder her, they gave her a glass dosed with poison. She drank it saying Krishna's name and the poison turned to nectar. Thus, they began to realize Mira was no ordinary person and was protected by Krishna.

Years passed and Mira's absorption became all-consuming. One day she left the palace and did not return. Singing Krishna's praises, she walked far until she reached Vrindavan, the sacred place of Krishna and the gopis, and remained there. When she did not return, the king searched far and wide. He finally found her, absorbed in her ecstatic vision of Krishna. Many people recognized that she was a genuine saint and stayed near her, and the king and his family became her followers.