EPISODE-39 (PANJ PYARE-2 BHAI DHARAM SINGH & DR, DAULAT SNGH)

EPISODE-39 (PANJ PYARE-2 BHAI DHARAM SINGH OF GURU GOBIND SINGH & DR. DAULAT SNGH OF AVATAR MEHER BABA)

Bhai Dharam Singh-Punj Piare-2 of Guru Govind Singh

Guru Gobind Singh came into this world with a special mission. He was the tenth Sadguru Sikh sect and performed certain duties for the emancipation of mankind. The Guru thus decided to evolve a new order with the sole object of making people realise the necessity of sacrificing their lives for the cause of dharma, righteousness. People should fight against the tyranny of the rulers, he said.
The Guru sent letters to his devotees, throughout the country, to come to Anandpur to attend the festival of Baisakhi. The devotees started converging on Anandpur like swarms of locusts. The year was 1699. A day before the first of Baisakh, a large number of people, including many women and children, collected at Anandpur. A large shamiana was pitched and decorated with buntings and flowers. Hymns from Sri Guru Granth Sahib were recited and divine atmosphere was created. Guru Gobind Singh was present in the pandal and listened attentively to the chanting of Asa-di-Var. He sat motionless for some time and then stood before the huge gathering, estimated to be about eighty thousand. His eyes were red like rays of the sun. He took His sword from the scabbard and flashing it in His hand, thundered like a lion: “My devoted Sikhs! My comrades! The goddess of power clamours for the head of brave Sikh. Is there anyone among this huge gathering ready to sacrifice his dear life at its call?”

Complete silence prevailed. People were stunned. They thought something had gone wrong with the Guru. The Guru once again roared. Again, there was no reply. The whole assembly was thrown into consternation. The Guru repeated His call. There was hushed silence. What the Guru wanted nobody knew. No Guru before Him had ever demanded the head of his followers like this. The Sikhs were surprised at the demand of the Guru who had all along been bestowing great affection on them. It was an amazing call. “Is there not one among the thousands who has faith in Me.” were the last words uttered by the Guru, flashing His eyes. People present there trembled. Now, Bhai Daya Ram, a Khatri of Lahore, stood up with folded hands before the Guru to the astonishment of the whole gathering. It was unique scene – the Sikh offering His head. The Guru caught him by arm and took him inside the tent specially pitched for the purpose. The Guru, after a few moments, came out with his sword dripping with blood. Blood flowed from the tent too. The Guru then asked for another man to offer his head.

On second call, Bhai Dharam Das, a Jat of Delhi offered his head and later three more offered their heads one by one.

Then Guru himself went into the tent and brought out the five Sikhs he had taken into the tent earlier. They were dressed in new clothes, with blue turbans on their heads and in loose long yellow shirts. They had waist bands and wore under wears of a special style, with swords hanging by their sides. They looked attractive and handsome like soldiers of velour. The audience was awe-struck. The Guru named them Panj Payaras, the five beloved ones. The whole congregation shouted with one voice Sat-Sri-Akal, Victory of God. The Guru address them thus; “I wish all of you embrace one faith and follow one path, obliterating all difference of caste and religion. Let the four Hindu castes mentioned in the Shastras be abandoned altogether and the path of co-operation with one another be adopted. Let nobody think himself superior to another. Do not follow the old scriptures. All should follow the tenets of Guru Nanak and his successors. Let men of the four castes receive My baptism and eat from the same vessel. Let nobody feel contempt for the other”.

Once again, the sky resounded with the shouts of Sat-Sri-Akal. The Guru was extremely delighted. He had achieved his objective. A new path was shown by him to his followers – the path of valours, devotion and sacrifice.

Bhai Dharam Singh was one of the Panj Piare or the five beloved, the fore-runners of Khalsa, came of farming stock. He was the son of Bhai Sant Ram and Mai Sabho, of Hastinapur, an ancient town on the right bank of the Ganges, 35 km northeast of Meerut. Dharam Das, as he was originally named, was born around 1666. As a young man, he fell into the company of a Sikh who introduced him to the teachings of the Gurus. He left home at the age of thirty in quest of further instruction. At the Sikh shrine of Nanak Piau dedicated to Guru Nanak, he was advised to go to Guru Gobind Singh at Anandpur, where he arrived in 1698. A few months later came the historic Baisakhi congregation at which five Sikhs responding to five successive calls of Guru Gobind Singh offered one after the other to lay down their heads Dharam Das was one of those five. The Guru blessed them and called them Panj Piare, the five beloved of Him. They were anointed as the first five members of the brotherhood of the Khalsa inaugurated on that day. Guru Gobind Singh then begged them to administer to him the vows of initiation. Dharam Das, who, after initiation, became Dharam Singh, took part in the battles of Anandpur. He was in Guru Gobind Singh’s train when Anandpur and thereafter Chamkaur were evacuated. He accompanied Bhai Daya Singh to the South to deliver Guru Gobind Singh’s letter, the Zafarnamah, to Emperor Aurangzeb.

During the war of succession following the death of Aurangzab on 20 February 1707, Guru Gobind Singh took the part of the rightful claimant to the imperial throne, Prince Muazzam and sent for his help Bhai Dharam Singh who with his small band of Sikhs fought in the battle of Jajau (8 June 1707). He accompanied Guru Gobind Singh to Nanded and was with him at the time of his heavenly abode on 7 October 1708. A Gurdwara there preserves the memory of Jointly Bhai Dharam Singh and Bhai Daya Singh.

 

Dr. Daulat Singh as one of Punj Piare of Avatar Meher Baba 

Dr. Daulat Singh was practicing medicine in England when he had a dream in which a disciple (Swami Bhabananda) introduced him to his Master Baba. Daulat Singh had never met either Bhabananda or Meher Baba. In the dream, the Master urged Daulat Singh, "Leave England and return to India. I have connections with you." Daulat Singh followed the advice, although he did not know who the Master was.

In India, Daulat Singh and his family settled in Srinagar, where he became a successful doctor and was even elected mayor. He began searching for his guru, but in vain. One day, when he was riding on a train, a man seated next to him was reading a book, and after some time, Daulat Singh casually glanced at the book. He was shocked. A picture in it was of the same man who had appeared in his dream. He asked to see the book and read the name: "Meher Baba, Ahmednagar." At the next station, he got down and caught the first train to Ahmednagar! As soon as he arrived, he made inquiries and took a Tonga to Meherabad. Now close to the fulfillment of all his wishes after so many years, he rushed to ask for Baba's darshan as soon as he arrived. Baba was at Meherabad then and was informed, but refused to see him.

Daulat Singh tried to check himself, but his disappointment was too great to conceal. He began sobbing aloud, "Am I such a sinner that Meher Baba will not see me? Is my love for him not sincere? Have I displeased him in any way?" After a few minutes, he regained his composure, and resolved to sit under a tree near the road until Baba granted him darshan. He remained there for ten days, without food or water.

On the tenth day, Baba sent Adi Sr. with instructions for Dr. Singh to return to Kashmir, travel on to Lahore, and contact Pilamai in Karachi. Daulat Singh did as he was told, and left Meherabad with a broken heart.

He contacted Pilamai, and asked her to promise to inform him as soon as Meher Baba was in the area. Weeping, he narrated his many years of searching and his recent experience at Meherabad.

Learning that Baba was in the vicinity, Daulat Singh came to Dehra Dun from Kashmir for Baba's darshan on the evening of 29 April 1941. It was summer in India, but Daulat Singh had been so restless to see Baba, he had come straight through on the train, 850 miles from Srinagar, fainting twice in the terrific heat. Nilu tried to calm him, talking to him at length, and explaining that during Baba's seclusion he was seeing no one. But Daulat Singh would not listen and said, "If I don't get darshan, I will die!"

Nilu informed Baba, and Baba permitted Daulat Singh to see him from a distance, specifying that he should not bow down to him or pay his respects, in any way. Placing six oranges on the floor, Daulat Singh said, "I have nothing more to offer you." From afar, Baba sent him word, "You don't know what you have given me! Whatever you have given is too much! Depart happily, and don't look back!" Daulat Singh obeyed and left after talking with Norina for an hour. "In those few moments," Age declared, "the doctor received that 'brand' of Wine which kept him intoxicated his entire life long!"

In 1958, When Daulat Singh came before Baba; he recited his usual prayer in Baba's praise and some couplets of Guru Nanak. Baba remarked, "I am very glad to see you. You are dear to me."