POWER IN THE NAME OF GOD

THE POWER OF BABA’S SECLUSION WORK

Some work still remained to be completed on the cabin, so Baba did not actually begin his seclusion until the evening of July 15th. No one was allowed near the new cabin unless called by Baba.

Padri and Pendu were occasionally called for work. Vishnu came each day from 3 to 4:30 P.M. to attend to correspondence, since Chanji continued to stay in Bombay. Baba would send him instructions through Vishnu. Chhagan kept watch at night.

At fixed time, Valu Pawar brought Baba food and tea prepared by Mehera. It was strictly forbidden to look inside the cabin when Baba was doing his seclusion work. One day, Valu brought Baba’s tray of food to the cabin at the appointed time. However, she found the door of the cabin closed. Believing the wind had blown the door shut, Valu pushed it open. Baba was seated inside engrossed in his inner work. He appeared startled and he looked up and stared at her. His powerful gaze overwhelmed Valu and her eyes immediately became full of pain. Afterward her eyes became bloodshot, then worsened and she suffered a blinded state for three days.

In this seclusion, Baba would occasionally send for the women to see them. When he did, following the incident with Valu, Gulmai beseeched him to take pity on Valu and forgive her mistake. Baba answered Gulmai’s plea and Valu’s sight was restored. This experience taught Valu to be extremely careful in the future in following Baba’s exacting orders. Since 1925, Valu had washed Baba’s clothes and kept his room clean. She was wholly dedicated to the Master, remaining so until her end. This incident became a sign of the power of the Master’s seclusion work.

Lord Meher, 1st ed., Bhau Kalchuri, Vol. 6, p. 1967 – 1968.

 

POWER IN THE NAME OF GOD

Espandiar Vesali had been a student in the Prem Ashram in Meherabad in 1927-1928. Soon after the school closed, he returned home to Iran and had not seen Baba since 1928. Espandiar longed to have Baba's darshan, but he wrote saying he had no money to travel to India. Through Baidul, Baba wrote back asking how much Espandiar was earning and what was the means of his livelihood. He answered in detail that he had a modest income from a cherry and apple orchard, but that most years the winter frost destroyed the blossoms on the trees. If he had a good crop, he would sell it and should there be any leftover amount from what he needed for his maintenance, he would be able to come to India. Otherwise, he would not be able to see Baba.

Baba instructed Baidul to write back saying that Espandiar should go to the trees in his orchard and speak to them: "It is 35 years since I have seen Meher Baba, and I want to go and visit him. So you, my crop, are not allowed to freeze. I beg of you trees to bear fruit in abundance so that I might be able to go to see my Lord. The frost and winter should not destroy my crop this year." Baba instructed him to walk around the trees and utter these words, and then not to think of anything else and not to worry.

So, Espandiar "spoke" to his trees every morning.

Certain of the fact that he would not lose his crop, Espandiar borrowed money and flew to Bombay. He arrived at Guruprasad on 5 May 1963 and was extremely anxious to meet his Master after more than 30 years of separation, but Baba did not grant him darshan at once. On the contrary, he sent word for him to sit outside and read verses from the Divan-e-Hafiz. Espandiar sat on the verandah reading the book. After about half an hour, Baba called him inside. To see him meet Baba after so many years was a touching scene. Putting his head on Baba's feet, he wept and wept. After a few minutes, Espandiar was lifted up and he embraced Baba.

Espandiar once had an unusual experience at his home in Tehran. One day he heard a knock, he opened the door and found an Imam (a Muslim priest) standing at the door. The Imam related that he had had a dream in which a voice told him that the eagerly awaited Imam Mehdi (Saheb-e-Zaman, the Rasool) is now on earth and he would find him at a certain house in Tehran. In his dream, he was guided to the house which he saw clearly in vivid detail. The next morning, the priest went in search of the house in the city, found it and knocked on the door. As he spoke, tears ran down Espandiar's cheeks, for his house served as the Avatar Meher Baba Center in Tehran, where weekly meetings were held.

Espandiar Vesali came to Guruprasad on 7 May, in a serious tone, Baba informed him, "You cannot stay here longer than today. You must return to Iran."

Vesali replied, "Baba, it has been 35 years since I have seen you. Please give me permission to remain with you for at least 20 days or a month."

Baba replied, "No, I am also with you in Iran. You should go back and work for Baba. Even if you lost your life because of this [borrowing money], don't pay heed to it, and work for me."

So Espandiar Vesali was driven by Adi to Meherabad, where he met Baidul. He was taken to Meherazad the following day and then left for Bombay. But at the airport he was informed he would have to purchase his ticket with Persian currency, and since he did not have anything other than Indian rupees, he was told it would be best to have his ticket sent from Iran. He returned to Guruprasad. Baba called him and when he heard what happened, stated, "All right, remain here until the answer to your letter arrives."

After a week, Baba instructed Vesali to travel to Bombay and see whether the answer had arrived. The letter had not come, so he returned to Guruprasad.

Baba again allowed him to remain in Poona. After another week, Baba directed him to go to Bombay again, but there was no letter or money and he had to return. In this way, Vesali remained in Poona for 20 days, until finally Baba instructed him to go to Bombay and wait for the reply there. The ticket came and just before leaving, he came back to Guruprasad to bid farewell to Baba.

Later that year, when the orchard crop was harvested, even though surrounding orchards had been severely damaged due to a harsh winter frost, Vesali's trees gave an unprecedented yield — much to the local farmers' amazement.

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